Difference between revisions of "Dubnium"

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cryst=Body centered cubic                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            |
 
cryst=Body centered cubic                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            |
 
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'''Dubnium''' is a Transition Metal in group 5.
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'''Dubnium''' is a Transition Metal in group 5. It has a Body centered cubic crystalline structure. It does not have any isotopes considered to be natural. Its longest-lived known isotope has an atomic number of 262 with a half life of 34 seconds. This element has no stable isotopes. Scientists use it in research into nuclear properties.  Some bulk properties have been predicted, such as a density of 29 grams per cubic centimeter.  There is no practical use for such properties.  However, it is conceivable that the measurement could be made with necessarily microscopic specks of dubnium very quickly prepared.  The specks could be shot through inert gas at targets.  The use of high speed recording equipment is familiar to nuclear researches so conducting the experiments and recording them entirely within a small fraction of a second might be possible. 
It has a Body centered cubic crystalline structure.
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It does not have any isotopes considered to be natural. Its longest-lived known isotope has an atomic number of 262.
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There was a controversy over naming dubnium.  American and Soviet scientists contributed to the research establishing the properties of dubnium.  Americans supported by allies wanted the name hahnium.  Soviets supported by allies wanted the name nielsbohriumThe name dubnium was adopted in 1997.
This element has no stable isotopes.   
 
 
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Latest revision as of 20:24, 11 November 2012

Dubnium
Db
In situ availability: unavailable
Necessity:
Atomic number: 105
Atomic mass: [262]
group: 5
period: 7
normal phase:
series: Transition Metals
density:
melting point:
boiling point:
HfTaW
Rf ← Db → Sg
N/AN/AN/A
Atomic radius (pm):
Bohr radius (pm): 139
Covalent radius (pm): 66
Van der Waals radius (pm):
ionic radius (pm):
1st ion potential (eV):
Electron Configuration
1s2
2s2 2p6
3s2 3p6 3d10
4s2 4p6 4d10 4f14
5s2 5p6 5d10 5f14
6s2 6p6 6d3
7s2
Electrons Per Shell
2, 8, 18, 32, 32, 11, 2
Electronegativity:
Electron Affinity:
Oxidation states:
Magnetism:
Crystal structure: Body centered cubic

Dubnium is a Transition Metal in group 5. It has a Body centered cubic crystalline structure. It does not have any isotopes considered to be natural. Its longest-lived known isotope has an atomic number of 262 with a half life of 34 seconds. This element has no stable isotopes. Scientists use it in research into nuclear properties. Some bulk properties have been predicted, such as a density of 29 grams per cubic centimeter. There is no practical use for such properties. However, it is conceivable that the measurement could be made with necessarily microscopic specks of dubnium very quickly prepared. The specks could be shot through inert gas at targets. The use of high speed recording equipment is familiar to nuclear researches so conducting the experiments and recording them entirely within a small fraction of a second might be possible.

There was a controversy over naming dubnium. American and Soviet scientists contributed to the research establishing the properties of dubnium. Americans supported by allies wanted the name hahnium. Soviets supported by allies wanted the name nielsbohrium. The name dubnium was adopted in 1997.




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